ABOUT US


Our Mission Statement


Our mission is to create a Ukrainian restaurant which will present Ukrainian culture and culinary tradition in a pleasing sophisticated modern way.

The Hutzuls are mountain people of the Carpathians in the western Ukraine. They produce exquisite handiwork including cross-stitched embroidery and Easter eggs (pysanky) created with a complex dyeing and waxing process. They rely on natural colors such as yellow orange red green and maroon/purple extracted from plants in their environment. In much the same way as they use these colors to decorate their lives, so have we attempted to infuse our menu with these same natural colors of pure simple foods. We offer you traditional Ukrainian cuisine with a fresh modern twist, adorned by the natural colorful components that we hope will help us eat healthfully and strengthen our connection to mother nature's pantry.


 

Our mission is to create a Ukrainian restaurant which will present Ukrainian culture and culinary tradition in a pleasing sophisticated modern way.

Why you must come to Tryzub


Although I grew up in the United States, I have always had a strong connection to the land of my ancestors, Ukraine. It had always amazed me that, although Ukraine is the largest country in Europe and home to 45 million people, many people had never heard of the country.

Only later as I became more familiar with the history of the world did I realize there was a specific reason why this was the case, and I'll touch upon this later. But it has always been my desire to do something to make the beautiful history, art and culture of Ukraine more accessible to members of the American society that I grew up in.

The name of the restaurant, Tryzub, means trident in Ukrainian, and it is a symbol of national identity for all Ukrainians. Millions of Ukrainians have died throughout the centuries for the freedom that this symbol signifies.

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A short history of
Ukraine


Early Ukrainian culture appears to have been highly advanced for its time, agricultural, matriarchal and peaceful. It was one of the ancient pre-Indo-European Neolithic cultures of Europe.

During the maximum extent of the last Ice Age, most of Ukraine found itself south of the ice sheet and was inhabited by people who are not well researched as yet. From around 6,000 BC to 3,500 BC the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture flourished in what would later become the southwestern half of Ukraine, all of Moldova and northeastern Romania.

In a process that is not yet well understood, their culture eventually or possibly violently, gave way to the influx of the nomadic, pastoral, patriarchal Indo-Europeans or Kurgans, but it is generally agreed, that the Trypillians were not displaced, but assimilated into the new culture that formed.

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